New Passport Rules – Date of Birth and Only one Parents Name


New Passport Rules  –  
December 23, 2016

  1. In order to streamline, liberalize and ease the process of issue of passport, the Ministry of External Affairs has taken a number of steps in the realm of passport policy which is expected to benefit the citizens of India applying for a passport. The details of these steps are given below:-

    PROOF OF DATE OF BIRTH

  2. As per the extant statutory provisions of the Passport Rules, 1980, all the applicants born on or after 26/01/1989, in order to get a passport, had to, hitherto, mandatorily submit the Birth Certificate as the proof of Date of Birth (DOB). It has now been decided that all applicants of passports can submit any one of the following documents as the proof of DOB while submitting the passport application:

    (i) Birth Certificate (BC) issued by the Registrar of Births & Deaths or the Municipal Corporation or any other prescribed authority whosoever has been empowered under the Registration of Birth & Deaths Act, 1969 to register the birth of a child born in India;

    (ii) Transfer/School leaving/Matriculation Certificate issued by the school last attended/recognized educational board containing the DOB of the applicant;

    (iii) PAN Card issued by the Income Tax Department with the DOB of applicant;

    (iv) Aadhar Card/E-Aadhar having the DOB of applicant;

    (v) Copy of the extract of the service record of the applicant (only in respect of Government servants) or the Pay Pension Order (in respect of retired Government Servants), duly attested/certified by the officer/in-charge of the Administration of the concerned Ministry/Department of the applicant, having his DOB;

    (vi) Driving licence issued by the Transport Department of concerned State Government, having the DOB of applicant;

    (vii) Election Photo Identity Card (EPIC) issued by the Election Commission of India having the DOB of applicant;

    (viii) Policy Bond issued by the Public Life Insurance Corporations/Companies having the DOB of the holder of the insurance policy.

    Report of the Inter Ministerial Committee

  3. A three-member Committee comprising of the officials of the Ministry of External Affairs and the Ministry of Women and Child Development was constituted to examine various issues pertaining to passport applications where mother/child has insisted that the name of the father should not be mentioned in the passport and also relating to passport issues to children with single parent and to adopted children. The Report of the Committee has been accepted by the Minister of External Affairs.

    The following policy changes have been made inter-alia on the basis of the recommendations of this Committee:

    (i) The online passport application form now requires the applicant to provide the name of father or mother or legal guardian, i.e., only one parent and not both. This would enable single parents to apply for passports for their children and to also issue passports where the name of either the father or the mother is not required to be printed at the request of the applicant.

    (ii) The total number of Annexes prescribed in the Passport Rule, 1980, has been brought down to 9 from the present 15. Annexes A, C, D, E, J, and K have been removed and certain Annexes have been merged.

    (iii) All the annexes that are required to be given by the applicants would be in the form of a self declaration on a plain paper. No attestation/swearing by/before any Notary/Executive Magistrate/First Class Judicial Magistrate would be henceforth necessary.

    (iv) Married applicants would not be required to provide Annexure K or any marriage certificate.

    (v) The Passport application form does not require the applicant to provide the name of her/his spouse in case of separated or divorced persons. Such applicants for passports would not be required to provide even the Divorce Decree.

    (vi) Orphaned children who do not have any proof of DOB such as Birth Certificate or the Matriculation Certificate or the declaratory Court order, may now submit a declaration given by the Head of the Orphanage/Child Care Home on their official letter head of the organization confirming the DOB of the applicant.

    (vii) In case of children not born out of wedlock, the applicant for the passport of such children should submit only Annexure G while submitting the passport application.

    (viii) In case of issue of passport to in-country domestically adopted children, submission of the registered adoption deed would no longer be required. In the absence of any deed to this effect, the passport applicant may give a declaration on a plain paper confirming the adoption.

    (ix) Government servants, who are not able to obtain the Identity Certificate (Annexure-B)/ No-Objection Certificate (Annexure-M) from their concerned employer and intend to get the passport on urgent basis can now get the passport by submitting a self-declaration in Annexure-‘N’ that he/she has given prior Intimation letter to his/her employer informing that he/she was applying for an ordinary passport to a Passport Issuing Authority.

    (x) Sadhus/ Sanyasis can apply for a passport with the name of their spiritual Guru mentioned in the passport application in lieu of their biological parent(s) name(s) subject to their providing of at least one public document such as Election Photo Identity Card (EPIC) issued by the Election Commission of India, PAN card, Adhar Card, etc wherein the name of the Guru has been recorded against the column(s) for parent(s) name(s).

  4. Necessary notifications would be soon published in the Official Gazette to give effect to these changes. Instructions are also being issued to the Passport Issuing Authorities in India and abroad on these revised regulations.

  5. The Ministry of External Affairs expects that the above changes in the Passport Rules would further ease the process for passport applicants in getting their Passport. At the same time, it would enable this Ministry to continue to deliver passport related services to the citizens in a timely, transparent, more accessible, reliable manner and in a comfortable environment through streamlined processes and committed, trained and motivated workforce.


New Delhi
December 23, 2016

 

National Green Tribunal decides on municipal issues such as parking spaces, recreation grounds and fire safety within the scope of environment jurisdiction


By this judgment, for the first time, the National Green Tribunal brought municipal issues such as parking spaces, recreation grounds and fire safety within the scope of environment jurisdiction.”

 

Judgement of the National Green Tribunal (Principal Bench, New Delhi) in the matter of Sunil Kumar Chugh & Ors. Vs. Secretary, Environment Department, Govt. of Maharashtra & amp; Ors. dated 03/09/2015

In this landmark order The National Green Tribunal, directed a developer to remit Rs 3 crore towards the environmental relief fund and stopped the construction and sale of a slum rehabilitation project at Antop Hill, Mumbai till the amount was paid and plans amended to include additional parking space.

The order was in an appeal filed by Sunil Chugh against environmental clearances granted to Priyali Builders last March for construction on a 6,500- sq m plot in Sion-Koliwada despite violations to the town planning and environmental laws.

After hearing advocate Aditya Pratap for Chugh, Vikas Malhotra for the environment department, Anand Yagnik for the Slum Rehabilitation Authority (SRA) as well as others, the tribunal panel, headed by former Supreme Court judge Swatanter Kumar, held that the builder needs to correct certain lapses in the project.

The panel directed the builder to pay Rs 3 crore to the SRA within a fortnight and Rs 32 lakh towards deficient recreational area to the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board for incurring expenses on environmental and ecological rehabilitation. The tribunal said that the developer must modify the building plans and get them approved for additional parking space in the sale building from the seventh storey upward to make parking space available for both the rehabilitation building and the sale building. It also imposed a Rs 1 lakh cost on the builder.

The land, which was encroached by slums, was reserved for a municipal office and road when the builder submitted a proposal to the SRA to rehabilitate 324 tenements in 1997. Five years later, the builder got the first letter of intent for 14,600 sq m built-up area and was later granted permission for more construction, which the tribunal was told exceeded 20,000 sq m attracting a prior environment clearance.

The builder said the SRA had permitted reduction in the amenity area to 8% and allowed the recreational area above the podium level. But the tribunal observed that the SC held that “right to clean and healthy environment is within the ambit of Article 21 (right to life) and that open land around a building can only be at the ground level, not podium”.

Observing lack of paucity of parking space, the tribunal directed that “three floors shall be made available from seventh floor onwards from the area available for construction of flats…to ensure adequate parking spaces…and ensure that vehicles do not spill out on the streets resulting in congestion and prevent adverse impacts on the environment”.

The judgment written by judicial member U D Salvi said the term built-up area includes both FSI and non-FSI areas. In this case, the built-up area was 30,000 sq m, which included over 12,000 sq m of non-FSI area. This will help end the practice of builders trying to separate the two to evade environment clearance, said a lawyer.

 

 Link to the full decision:

http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/building%20environment%20clearance%20NGT%20Mumbai.pdf

Lokayukta, Maharasthra  –  How to file Complaint

 

Lokayukta, Maharasthra  –  How to file Complaint with

Complaints of corruption and grievance against public servants in the state can be lodged online. The office of the Lokayukta, the state’s anti-corruption ombudsman, has launched its website.


While inaugurating the website a few months ago, Lokayukta Justice (retired) M L Tahaliyani said: “Most problems facing the country today are due to the disease of corruption that is growing at a rapid pace. The lokayukta functions to protect the interest of the common man and receives complaints from big scams to smaller grievances about pensions not being paid. The website is a way to take the office of the lokayukta closer to the people to make it more effective. The message has to go out to everyone that dishonesty does not pay.”

 

Grievance

A grievance has to be filed within 12 months of the date on which the action complained against became known to the complainant.

 

Allegation

An allegation can be made within 3 years from the date on which the action complained against is said to have taken place

 How to lodge Complaints Online

Citizens can file complaints through the Lokayukta’s website address : lokayukta.maharashtra.gov.in

The site at present includes information about the law, the ways to lodge a complaint and the format in which a complaint should be lodged.


The office of the Lok Ayukta, Maharashtra receives between 6,000 and 7,000 complaints a year. These include grievances as well as allegations of corruption.

As of now, the Lokayukta has only powers to recommend action. But a Complaint often resolves the problem.


The website address is :

lokayukta.maharashtra.gov.in